Waldkliniken Eisenberg

Architects
Matteo Thun & Partners, Milan/Italy

Planning time
2014 – 2015 and 2017

Services by Werner Sobek
Energy and sustainability potential study
Analysis and documentation of the existing structural and systems technological state of affairs
Development of a short-term energy concept and a mediumterm, multi-stage modernisation strategy

Client
Waldkliniken Eisenberg GmbH, Eisenberg/Germany

GFA
35.000 m²

Photographer
Björn Walther

The Waldkliniken (“Forest Hospital Clinics”) in the East Thuringian town of Eisenberg, Germany, form part of the largest university orthopaedics centre in Europe along with the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena’s Institute of Orthopaedics on the same site. The facility also ensures the provision of basic and general care to patients throughout the surrounding Saale-Holzland district. The Waldkliniken aim to power their existing buildings and forthcoming new structures with climate-neutral energy in the near future by increasing their use of renewable energy and implementing intelligent consumption control. In so doing, the Clinics also aspire to become the very first complete hospital facility to comply with the Aktivhaus standard developed by Werner Sobek. Werner Sobek advised the institution on this plan over several years. The options for achieving the intended objectives were investigated in detail as part of a study funded by the Thuringian Ministry for the Environment, Energy and Nature Conservation with resources from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

These investigations were based on an in-depth analysis of the Clinics’ existing buildings and proposed construction plans. The aspects taken into consideration ranged from the heat and cooling generators and the building envelopes’ energy characteristics right through to the individual light sources and circulating pumps. This analysis was followed by an examination of the renewable sources of energy and heat that could potentially be accessed on site. Annual energy savings, dynamic amortisation periods, and the amount of avoided CO2 emissions were all calculated for each of the measures investigated. This research was used as the basis for developing a short-term, financially viable energy concept that can initiate the first steps on the road to a climate-neutral hospital site. This energy strategy makes use of the efficiency potentials in the existing buildings, envisages increasing the number of photovoltaic systems on the premises, and puts measures into place that can immediately be implemented as a part of the forthcoming extension project.